Category Archives: Elementary Education

Fostering Wonder and Curiosity for Science and Research at Home

Little Girl in Wonder watching a hose spray water

How great God is and how great is His creation! Every time I gaze at the stars, scan the canopy of heaven, inhale the beauty of the ocean, explore underwater sea creatures, touch the soft fur of my favorite canine, or marvel at a spider’s orb web, I gasp and declare that God’s creation shouts His glory.

I am awed by His handiwork, wrapped up in His beauty, and enveloped in His love as He displays His love through the gift of nature. We were created by God and placed in a garden among plants and creatures. Nature is the place where we flourish as we are nourished by His love and beauty in the created order. We learn about our Creator through the book of nature (see Romans 1). And so, as an educator, I’ve always given value to building upon the natural design of the child which is consistently awe, wonder, and curiosity in relationship to the created order.

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Don’t Do It Alone

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The Vandewalles have been homeschooling their six children since 1999 and are about to graduate their third student. Until last year, most of their homeschooling was done at home without the benefit of outside classes;  like so many families, they were busy with activities and the daily demands of life. Academically, they tended to focus more on their high school students in order to prepare them for college.

Robyn Vandewalle shares, “A couple of years ago, we realized that our younger students, now entering middle school, had skated by with less academic attention than would be ideal. Read more

Finding the Language Arts Curriculum That’s Right for You

Language Arts CurriculumWhether you are in a PSP that provides curriculum or you are choosing your own textbooks, it is important to know what to look for in a language arts curriculum. No matter what your child’s reading level, the right curriculum can enhance and challenge your child’s reading development, comprehension, and fluency. It can be quite tempting to simply go with a curriculum that has been recommended by someone you trust, but how do you know it will work well for your child? Sometimes we don’t know until we try it. Clouding the issue even further are the numerous language arts options available, each claiming innovative learning strategies. Some are purely workbook studies, while others use a hands-on approach.  A number of language arts curriculum uses traditional pedagogy, while others are designed with classical education in mind. How does one process all of this in order to make the best choice? Read more