Category Archives: Walking it Out

The Easiest Way to Memorize the Bible: What I Learned from Dr. John Mitchell

Author’s Note: Today I’m excited to share with you a piece that I wrote a number of years ago about how to memorize the Bible. This little article — which you can read on my blog, Kindle Afresh — has probably been read by more people than anything else I’ve written in my life. I hope that it will increase your desire and confidence to keep hiding God’s Word in your heart.

Girl looking over the top of her Bible – Memorize the Bible – BYA blog

One of my professors in college was really old. I can hear everyone asking: “How old was he?” (No, his social security number wasn’t 7…). Let’s put it this way: he was the founder of the college at which I was studying (Multnomah in Portland, Oregon), and the school was celebrating the half century mark of its founding while I was there! In fact, Dr. John Mitchell was over the age of 90 when he taught the two classes I took from him. He continued to teach well into his mid-90s. Not surprisingly, he was getting forgetful about some things by the time I had him as a teacher, but what he definitely was not forgetting were the Bible verses he had memorized. His ability to recall Bible verses was astounding.  I do not know this for a fact, but I would guess that he had all of the New Testament and large sections of the Old Testament committed to memory. All of his students were profoundly impacted by his immersion in the Scriptures. Read more

Five Tips for Dealing with Unsupportive Family and Friends

Editor’s Note: While homeschooling success stories abound, choosing to homeschool is often still seen as an unconventional path. Have you ever received pushback from unsupportive family and friends on your choice to homeschool? Veola Vazquez, a prolific author and professor of psychology at California Baptist University, lends her insights on how a homeschooling family can best endure when loved ones disagree.

Two brothers walk toward the beach – Unsupportive Family and Friends blog

Have you heard comments such as these?

“Your kids will never compete academically with public school kids.”

“Your kids will end up with social problems.”

“You can’t keep your kids in a bubble.” Read more

Should you be sheltering students from evidence against Christianity?

Editor’s Note: Sean McDowell is an internationally known apologist, author and expert on helping youth cultivate a flourishing faith. Originally posted to SeanMcDowell.org on January 13, 2017, today’s article was the #1 post on his blog last year. Have thoughts to share about Sheltering Students? Join the conversation on Facebook.

Teenage girl with backpack steps into a shelter in the woods

Sheltering students from beliefs contrary to Christianity is a big mistake. Let me say it again, to be sure it sinks in: Sheltering students from arguments for other religions, or against Christianity, is a bad strategy for developing them as disciples in the faith.

In his book You Lost Me, researcher David Kinnaman argues that “protecting” kids from opposing viewpoints is ultimately detrimental to their faith. Like “helicopter parents” who “hover” over their children to keep them from any conceivable danger, many young Christians feel that the church demonizes everything outside the church, fails to expose students to the complexities of the “real” world, and is too overprotective. Read more

The Young Entomologist

bugs

For a number of years I taught writing classes to homeschooling children. I loved teaching this class. I’ll never forget one particular young man (let’s call him Charlie) and his keen interest in insects. When I asked him to write a story, he would create insect characters. When I asked him to write a poem, it would be about an insect. When I asked him to write a report, he would choose an insect to study. Charlie was completely enthralled with insects. Read more

Find Your Family Mission

Many hands togetherDoes your family have a ministry or mission? Moving overseas is not the only way to serve. Our fragmented society does all it can to “divide and conquer” our families, even Christian homeschooling families, with too many activities, different schedules, jobs, sports, and more. Even at church, we all-too-often find our family members heading in multiple directions. Read more

This Was the Year the Adults Gave Up

Teenagers looking at the camera with text "This was the year the adults gave up" - Don't Give Up on Your Teenager blog

Columnist Joel Stein in the December 21 issue of TIME (p. 174) labeled 2015 as “The Year the Adults Gave Up.”

Stein writes: “All kids know the one, immutable truth that is the source of all their power: Adults give up. They’re lazy. That’s why they still have cable and landlines, and why their kids ultimately get all the ice cream, iPad games and Smosh videos they want.  So it’s no surprise that after years of enduring all that sexting, app-ing and startup-ing, 2015 was the Year the Adults Gave Up. Even the most responsible workers in journalism, copy editors, just let me capitalize four words for no reason.”

Joel Stein has a way with words, and his article is provocative. But is he correct in his assertion that parents en masse are giving up?  Read more